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GM-OMG! There’s a Ketchup and French Fries Plant Out There

GM-OMG! There’s a Ketchup and French Fries Plant Out There


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The TomTato plant is a plant that grows both potatoes and tomatoes, and it’s finally commercially available

If only we could have a mustard plant involved somehow.

Growing your own fries and ketchup may sound silly, but it’s a reality with the TomTato plant, a plant developed by a British horticulture company Thompson & Morgan that grows both tomatoes and potatoes at the same time.Although developed in 2013, the plant, appropriately nicknamed the “ketchup and fries plant,” is now available for commercial purchase. That’s right: You can grow your very own endless batch of fries and ketchup in your own backyard.

For now, the plant will only be available to British consumers but if popular, will likely make its way to the States and beyond.

The product took nearly six years to produce, for the Dutch scientists beyond the ingenious invention to grafting a stem wide enough to support the weight of two different types of produce in one plant. The intention of Thomspon & Morgan horticulturalists was to create a plant that would be a space-saver for those with small growing areas.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


How French's ketchup took a bite out of Heinz

Just before barbecue season ignites, Heinz ketchup has launched a new TV ad to woo Canadians. The commercial climaxes with the brand smothering a lonely plate of fries to the tune of What About Love by Heart.

But the ad may not be enough to win back the hearts of Canadians who left Heinz a few years ago, angered by its decision to move its ketchup manufacturing operations from Leamington, Ont., to the U.S.

Many defectors turned to a relative newcomer to the ketchup scene, French's, which promised to use only Canadian-grown tomatoes.

French's customers have remained loyal, allowing the brand to take a bite out of Heinz's stranglehold on the Canadian ketchup market — a notable feat, considering Heinz has been selling ketchup in Canada for more than a century.

"Condiments are intrinsically linked to attitudes and habits," said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor at Halifax's Dalhousie University who specializes in food distribution and policy.

"What French's has accomplished in recent years is unheard of."

French's sustained success is likely due to a combination of ingredients, including a spate of free publicity, as well as a Canadian-made ketchup that offers a taste and price consumers find palatable.

"The Canadian stuff only gets you so far," said food industry analyst Kevin Grier. "Their product must be good enough to stick around."

French's ketchup — owned by U.S. food company McCormick — launched in Canada in late 2015. According to market research company Euromonitor, the brand quickly gained ground, and snagged 5.1 per cent of Canadian retail ketchup sales by 2018. It ranks as Heinz's biggest competitor.

Heinz ketchup — owned by U.S. food company Kraft Heinz — still held 77.5 per cent of the market share in 2018. But that's a 6.2 per cent drop from 2015.

Presumably, French's growth has come at Heinz's expense.


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