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Dutch Startup Introduces Seaweed Pasta, Looking to Replace Wheat with Sea Vegetables

Dutch Startup Introduces Seaweed Pasta, Looking to Replace Wheat with Sea Vegetables


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A Dutch startup, just six months old, called Seamore has big dreams for seaweed. Himanthalia, commonly known as sea spaghetti, is migrating from the seafloor to the dinner plate. It’s being pitched as a healthy substitute for pasta, providing the same texture while increasing vegetable intake. And while it’s not well-known yet, Seamore hopes that it will become a household item soon.

According to the company’s founder, Willem Sodderland, himanthalia is a simple and elegant carb replacement, allowing consumers to eat their favorite foods while being “much more healthy and sustainable.”

Harvested by hand, himanthalia is rinsed and dried while preserving its core nutrients, before being packed and sold to consumers. The sea vegetable — Willem’s preferred term — is only found along Europe’s Atlantic Coast.

So far, sea spaghetti has proved to be popular among its target audience, primarily low-carb dieters and the gluten-intolerant, looking to still be able to enjoy delicious spaghetti dishes. However, because of the small supply and sustainable harvesting practices (Seamore only takes about 15 percent of the available himanthalia, which takes two years to grow back), the company is looking to cultivate the plant themselves. This long-term effort will help bring Seamore’s high price point — it now costs $5.57 plus shipping for 5 servings — into closer competition with that of pasta, says Stoddard.

Seamore’s product is already in Dutch supermarkets and selling in six European countries. However, America, with its long-standing squeamishness about food (try to picture yourself eating any of these dishes), might be more reticent about trying seaweed pasta.

But in a world where people are being more creative with their food each day, perhaps seaweed (and its 10,000 species) will be food’s newest frontier, and carb-conscious folks’ new niche love.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.


The Autoimmune Protocol


Autoimmune disease is an epidemic in our society, affecting an estimated 50 million Americans. But it doesn&rsquot have to be. Although genetic predisposition accounts for approximately one-third of your risk of developing an autoimmune disease, the other two-thirds comes from your environment, your diet, and your lifestyle. In fact, experts are increasingly recognizing that certain dietary factors are key contributors to autoimmune disease, placing these autoimmune conditions in the same class of diet- and lifestyle-related diseases as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This means that autoimmune disease is directly linked to our food choices and how we decide to live your life. It also means that we can manage and reverse autoimmune disease simply by changing how you eat and making more informed choices about sleep, activity, and stress&hellip and that&rsquos some pretty darned good news!

There are more than one hundred confirmed autoimmune diseases and many more diseases that are suspected of having autoimmune origins (download a complete list here). The root cause of all autoimmune diseases is the same: our immune system, which is supposed to protect us from invading microorganisms, turns against us and attacks our proteins, cells, and tissues instead. Which proteins, cells, and tissues are attacked determines the autoimmune disease and its symptoms. In Hashimoto&rsquos thyroiditis, the thyroid gland is attacked. In rheumatoid arthritis, the tissues of your joints are attacked. In psoriasis, proteins within the layers of cells that make up your skin are attacked.

How does the immune system get so confused that it starts to attack our own bodies? It turns out that autoimmunity, the ability for the immune system to attack native tissues, is a relatively common accident. In fact, about 30% of people will have measurable levels of autoantibodies (antibodies that bind to some protein in our bodies instead of, or in addition to, a foreign protein, called an antigen) in their blood at any given time. In fact, this accident is so common, that our immune system has several failsafes for identifying autoimmunity and suppressing it. What occurs in autoimmune disease isn&rsquot just the accident of autoimmunity, but also failure of the immune system failsafes, stimulation of the immune system to attack, and the build up of enough damage in cells or tissues within the body to manifest as symptoms of a disease.



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