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How to Make Your Own Cream-Filled Doughnuts

How to Make Your Own Cream-Filled Doughnuts


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Now you can make this cream-filled treat at home the easy way

Thinkstock / yuelan

Here, at The Daily Meal, we used store-bought biscuit dough for a quick and easy no-mess doughnut, but if you prefer to start from scratch use your favorite yeast dough recipe, or try our favorite brioche doughnut dough.

Feel free to experiment with flavors by adding extracts to doughnut glazes, flavoring whipped cream fillings with spices, or making your cream-filled doughnut a jelly-filled one with homemade jams.

Follow these 10 simple steps for these quick and easy cream-filled doughnuts that will leave store-bought doughnuts in the dust and your guests impressed with your pastry skills.

How to Make Your Own Cream-Filled Doughnuts

Thinkstock / yuelan

Here, at The Daily Meal, we used store-bought biscuit dough for a quick and easy no-mess doughnut, but if you prefer to start from scratch use your favorite yeast dough recipe, or try our favorite brioche doughnut dough.

Feel free to experiment with flavors by adding extracts to doughnut glazes, flavoring whipped cream fillings with spices, or making your cream-filled doughnut a jelly-filled one with homemade jams.

Follow these 10 simple steps for these quick and easy cream-filled doughnuts that will leave store-bought doughnuts in the dust and your guests impressed with your pastry skills.

Tools and Mise en Place

Thinkstock / taratata

For the equipment, you will need: a heavy pot filled with three inches of vegetable oil, a fry thermometer, a sheet tray lined with paper towels, a small bowl with cinnamon sugar or glaze, and a pastry bag fitted with 3 or 4 mm scalloped pastry tip.

Preparing the Pastry Cream

Thinkstock / Magone

For the filling, we prepared a standard pastry cream, and then lightened it with unsweetened whipped cream at a 2 parts pastry cream to 1 part whipped cream ratio.

Choosing the Dough

Thinkstock / letterberry

Traditionally, yeast doughs are used for making doughnuts. Brioche-style doughs work well for a light and airy product. For simplicity, store-bought doughs, like canned biscuit dough or frozen pizza dough produce excellent doughnuts in a pinch.

Preparing the Dough

If using brioche, roll out your dough that has been prepared according to the recipe. The doughnuts should be about a 3/4-inch thick. Using a 2 or 3-inch round cookie cutter, cut out doughnuts. Then, place on a parchment lined sheet tray. Finally, allow the doughnuts to proof for 30 minutes to an hour or until the dough gently springs back when poked.

If you are using store-bought canned biscuit dough, simply remove and separate the pre-cut biscuits and arrange on a parchment lined sheet tray. Allow the dough to come to room temperature before frying.

Preparing the Frying Oil

Using a vegetable oil with a high smoke point, such as corn oil or canola oil, add about 3-inches of oil to a heavy pan. Using a fry thermometer, heat the oil until it reaches 350 degrees F. If you don’t have a thermometer you can use the handle of a wooden spoon. Simply place the wooden spoon in the oil; the oil will bubble around the wooden handle when itis hot and ready for frying.

Frying the Doughnuts

Thinkstock / yula

Place the doughnuts in the hot oil gently, being careful not to splatter. Then, fry the doughnuts for 1 to 2 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Remove the doughnuts from the oil using a slotted spoon or spider strainer. Allow the excess oil to drip off and place the doughnuts on the paper towel-lined sheet pan.

Toss in Cinnamon Sugar

Thinkstock / Christina-J-Hauri

To make the cinnamon sugar, combine ½ cup sugar with 2 tablespoons of ground cinnamon. You can add a pinch of cardamom, vanilla powder, black pepper, ground nutmeg, and other spices if you wish. Allow the doughnuts to cool slightly on the sheet pan. Then toss in cinnamon sugar while still warm. Allow the doughnuts to cool completely on a tray before filling with the pastry cream.

Using a Pastry Bag

Handling a pastry bag can feel awkward at first. Cut the tip of the bag to fit your pastry tip. Then place the bag in any cup you have on hand and fold the top of the pastry bag over the rim of the cup. Then add your filling ( in this case, pastry cream) until the bag is roughly half full. Pull up the sides of the bag and remove any air from the bag. Once the bag is full, twist it, squeezing from the top of the bag until pastry cream comes out of the pastry bag. Now you are all set to pipe the filling into the doughnuts.

Filling the Doughnuts

Thinkstock / Carpe89

To fill the doughnuts, make a small hole half way between the top and bottom of the doughnut. Using your pastry bag filled with the cream, fill the doughnuts with about a 1/3 cup of cream. The doughnuts will feel heavy when filled.

The Finished Product

Thinkstock / yuelan

Finally, serve your doughnuts. Because of the cream, these doughnuts are best served warm on the same day they were made. Also important to note: when using store-bought alternative doughs, like canned biscuit or pizza dough, these doughnuts texture will harden the longer they sit, so enjoy these doughnuts immediately after making for a light and airy texture.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.



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